THE WHO’S SUBSTITUTE DRUMMER, T. SCOT HALPIN, TO HAVE DAILY MEMORIAL BLOG

THE WHO’S SUBSTITUTE DRUMMER, T. SCOT HALPIN, IS TO HAVE A MEMORIAL BLOG FEATURING A WORK OF HIS ART AND MUSIC, EACH DAY FOR ONE YEAR, COMMENCING FEBRUARY 9, 2009, THE FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF HIS PASSING.
 
Scot Halpin passed away last year at the young age of 54. He is known by many as the kid who got to come up out of the audience, sit in for an ailing Keith Moon and finish the set with The Who, thereby living the dream of Who fans, Keith Moon lovers, and anyone baptized in the churning, burning waters of rock and roll. Rock fans around the world can mourn the loss of their advocate–the guy who sojourned from their lands into the realm of the gods and returned anointed. Throughout his life, Halpin marveled at the mythological nature of the mantle he inadvertently snatched that night.
 
Over the years, the story of Scot playing with The Who gained momentum, from the beginning, taking on a life of its own. Television, newspapers, radio and books all picked it up. “I never met a person that was not wowed by the story,” laughs Robin Halpin Young, Halpin’s wife and partner of 30 years. “Across class lines, creative lines, geographic lines, age lines—everyone was equally impressed.”
 
The whole time The Who story was chugging along, Halpin was busy being a phenomenal visual artist and musician in a world of his own creation. As a columnist in his local paper put it, the “gig with The Who was a footnote in a life well-lived.” Now that he has passed, Halpin’s family and friends are actively engaged in excavating the enormous body of artwork and music he left behind.
 
“We are only really beginning to take stock of the depth and breath of his work now that he has passed,” explains Halpin Young. “While Scot was alive, his entire focus was on living his creative time to the absolute fullest. This meant there was always precious little time for review and reflection. The idea for the memorial blog came to me almost immediately after he passed. Scot has left us with literally thousands of drawings, paintings, etchings, and sculpture. Add to that, thousands of hours of recorded music. I hope the blog will be a little bit history, a little bit insight into a remarkable life, and ultimately, the beginning of a worldwide sharing of a great creative effort.”
 
The blog can be accessed starting February 9th, 2009 at http://tscothalpin.blogspot.com